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Antique Print & Map Room

(Louis Kissajukian, Susie Kissajukian)
Shops 7-11, Level 2
Queen Victoria Building
455 George Street Sydney NSW 2000
Very large stock of antique prints, maps, paintings, and photographs of Australia, Pacific, South East Asia, World. Reference books. Catalogues issued. We are always wanting to buy single items or collections.

Items for Sale

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Circa: 1889
Price: $1,250
1.Tanysiptera Sylvia. White-tailed Kingfisher. 2.Dacelo Gigas. Laughing Jackass. Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 360mm x 260mm. The best coloured set we have had. In good condition.
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Circa: 1744
Price: $8,950
Mapmaker: Emanuel Bowen (1693-1767), Size: 370mm x 480mm, Copper engraving. Condition: good condition, no off setting and with full margins. This map is often found with the top margin cropped and replaced. The first large-scale English map solely devoted to Australia and one of only two such maps to be issued pre-Cook, the other being published in 1663 by Thevenot, on which this map is based. Bowen has added the Tropic of Capricorn as well as several decorative elements to his map, including an elegant title cartouche, a compass rose and two panels of text. The lower panel of text states ‘it is impossible to conceive a country that promises fairer from this situation than this of TERRA AUSTRALIS; no longer incognita as this map demonstrates, but this Southern Continent Discovered’. Bowen incorrectly states on the map that the continent was discovered in 1644. The map depicts Australia according to Abel Tasman’s first and second voyages 1642-44. The VOC had appointed Tasman on 1 August 1642 as commander of the Heemskerck and Zeehaen with instructions to explore the unknown and previously undiscovered areas of the South Land, the southeast coast of New Guinea and surrounding islands. Tasman’s two voyages resulted in the charting of the northern, northwestern and southern limits of the continent as well as the discovery of part of the New Zealand coast. The map also records the following earlier Dutch discoveries on the Australian coast: Hartog in the Eendracht 1616, Houtman in the Dordrecht and Amsterdam 1619, the van Leeuwin 1622, Carstensz in the Leijden 1623, Nuyts in the Gulden Zeepaert 1627 and de Wit in the Vianen 1628. From John Harris’s Navigantium atque Itinerantium Bibliotheca, or a Complete Collection of Voyages and Travels. References: Clancy 6.25 ill.p.91, Clancy (R) p.138, ill.pp.136-138, Perry p.60-61, ill.pl.29, Prescott 1744.01, Schilder 87, ill.417, Tooley 241, ill. pl.12.
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Circa: 1792
Price: $1,500
Artist: Edward Blake, Copper engraving, 250mm x 210mm. In very good condition, wide margins no repairs.
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Circa: 1596
Price: $4,500
Mapmaker: Jan Huyghen van Linschoten (1563– 1611). Size: 565mm x 795mm, Copper engraving. Condition: Small section reinstated in manuscript along lower horizontal fold and some minor loss of engraving in places. Spectacular engraved plan of Goa by Jan Huyghen van Linschoten, the author of the most important travel account of the East Indies which revealed, for the first time, the exact location of and navigational routes to the fabled Spice Islands, effectively bringing an end to Portuguese control of the lucrative spice trade in the East. Linschoten was born in Haarlem in the Netherlands, leaving at the age of thirteen to join his brothers in Seville where he remained employed in the house of a merchant for six years. After the Portuguese War of Succession in 1580 and the decline of his brother’s business, Linschoten travelled with his brother aboard the India Fleet to Goa where he had secured employment as a clerk of the newly appointed Portuguese Archbishop. The Portuguese first took possession of Goa following Admiral Afonso de Albuquerue’s conquest over the Ottoman forces in 1510. The city was then used as a base to further expand Portuguese presence through the region. Albuquerque then conquered Malacca in 1511 gaining control of the important Malacca straits and with it, the route to the Spice Islands. By the time of Linschoten’s arrival in September 1583, Goa was the jewel in the crown of the Portuguese empire and one of the premier cities of the world, rivalling many European cities in importance and fame. A common saying of the time was, ‘he who has seen Goa need not see Lisbon’. Indeed, the city enjoyed the same civic privileges as Lisbon, with the Goan Senate having direct links to the King and its own special representative at court. As capital of the Portuguese’s extensive East Indian empire, Goa was the centre of military, political and religious power in the region. The Archbishop of Goa was a powerful position, equal in social and political status to the Viceroy of India, who also resided in Goa and who was responsible for all the Portuguese interests in Asia, including the East Indies. Linschoten spent just over six years in Goa, during which time he keenly observed the administration of the city, the people and the trade that flourished there. In his published account Itinerario , Linschoten described the wealth, power and commerce of the cosmopolitan city, stating that: ‘The Citie of Goa, is the Metropolitan or chiefe Cittie of all Orientall Indies, where the Portingales have their traffique, where also the Viceroye, the Archbishop, the Kings Councel, and Chauncerie have their residence, and from thence are all [places in] the Orientall Indiess, governed [and ruled]. There is likewise the staple for all Indian commodoties, whether all sorts of Marchants doe resort, comming thether both to buy and sell, as out of Arabia, Armenia, Persia, Cambaia, Bengala, Pegu, Sian, Malacca, Java, Molucca, China, etc’ As Linschoten describes, Goa was a key trading port for goods from the region, including, importantly, spices arriving from the Moluccas. While Goa had been a centre of the spice trade since early times, the Portuguese and their maritime empire greatly expanded the city’s importance. Linschoten’s unlikely presence there and his equally unlikely access to the closely held maritime and trading secrets of the Portuguese Empire, enabled him to publish what would be an explosive account, changing the course of history and shaping the destinies of the European maritime powers for the next two hundred years. From Linschoten’s Itinerario, Voyage ofte Schipvaert. naer Oost ofte Portugaels Indien. References: Allen p.62-64, Howgego D131, Linschoten pp.158-227, Perry p.6, ill.pl.1, Schilder (K) p.19-23, Suarez p.177.
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Circa: 1705
Price: $4,250
Mapmaker: Herman Moll (1654-1732), Size: 540mm x 925mm, Copper engraving. Condition: Two spots, otherwise in good condition. Large-scale world chart on Mercator’s projection printed on two sheets, by the eminent English cartographer Herman Moll, who had come to London to work as an engraver and later set up on his own account as a map publisher. On either side of the equator is a wide shaded area showing the trade winds and monsoons with a note lower centre that states that ‘the Arrows among the lines shew the Course of those General and Coasting Trade Winds, and the Arrows in the void spaces shew the Course of the Monsoons or Shifting Trade Winds and the Abbreviations Sept. & c. shew the Time of the Year when such Winds blow’. The map features two compass roses, ships and an inset of the North Pole in the top right corner. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, Dutch supremacy in mapmaking was being challenged by the new era of scientific cartography that had been established in France and England by mapmakers such as Sanson, Cassini, Speed, Seller and Thornton. This development in cartography was driven by the expansion of the maritime empires of these two rival nations. Australia is shown according to the discoveries made by Abel Tasman on his first and second voyages 1642-44 and includes the place names of earlier visits by Dirk Hartog 1616 and Jan Cartensz 1623. Also shown are the Trial Islands near present-day Dampier, named after the wreck of the English ship the Trial in 1622. The VOC’s instructions for Tasman’s second voyage were, in part, to chart areas of the South Land ‘yet unknown’ but also to investigate trade opportunities with the inhabitants of New Holland that would benefit the VOC directly. Tasman found it difficult to engage with the Australian Aborigines who often ran away from the Dutch sailors and did not seem interested in the goods that the VOC offered. His unfavourable report of trade opportunities and the lack of visible trade commodities meant that the VOC lost interest in further exploration of New Holland, instead focusing on its commercial activities in the East Indies and the charting of areas where its ships were already active. The Dutch reports of the Australian continent also convinced other nations that the area was of little value and as a result, the continent would remain unchanged on maps until the discovery of the east coast by James Cook some 125 years later. California is shown as a large island. From the first edition of John Harris’s Navigantium atque itinerantium bibliotheca; or, A complete collection of voyages and travels.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $145
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660). Copper engraving, 135mm x 265mm. In good condition. From, Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi.
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Circa: 1883
Price: $175
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 210mm x 300mm. In good condition. Sixteen kms from Melbourne CBD. In 1877 Samuel Gardiner purchased the property and established a racehorse stud named "Bundoora Park". "
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Circa: 1784
Price: $750
Artist: John Webber (1752-1793). Copper engraving, 350mm x 280mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1882
Price: $325
Artist: Rosa Catherine Fiveash (1854-1938). Lithograph printed in colour, 445mm x 340mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1882
Price: $350
Artist: Rosa Catherine Fiveash (1854-1938). Lithograph printed in colour, 445mm x 340mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1876
Price: $275
Artist: Albert Cooke (1836-1902). Hand coloured engraving,100mm x 345mm. Minor creasing right hand side otherwise in very good condition. Rare image of Albert Park from the original edition of the Illustrated Australian News.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $250
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1691
Price: $8,500
Mapmaker: Vincenzo Coronelli (1650-1718) Size: 615mm x 460mm, Copper engraving on two sheets. Condition: Good, centre fold as issued. Impressive two-sheet map of Asia by Vincenzo Coronelli which was very advanced for its day, using geographical information sourced from the Jesuits who had an extensive network of missions in Asia. A panel on the left of the map includes a note acknowledging the geographical activities of the Jesuits and the title cartouche includes a dedication to Thyrsus González de Santalla, the thirteenth Superior-General of the Society of Jesus. Coronelli himself was a Franciscan priest and widely recognised as one of the greatest cartographers and globemakers of the seventeenth century, famous for having constructed a pair of the world’s largest globes for King Louis XIV. Measuring over 4.5 metres in diameter and weighing approximately two tonnes, the globes were large enough to hold up to thirty people inside. Text on the map notes several points of interest including ‘Tera di Concordia was discovered in the year 1618’, referring to the discoveries made by Hartog in the Eendracht in 1616, not 1618. Jacobsz’s voyage is noteworthy for the fact that on board the Mauritius was Anthony van Diemen and Willem Jansz, former master of the Duyfken, on his second voyage to Australia. Another note states: ‘they believe that the newly discovered land is M. Polo’s the country of Lochac…’. Although these comments perpetuate the age-old errors from the scribed accounts of Marco Polo, the map does accurately record other Dutch discoveries in Australia including those of Houtman in the Dordrecht and Amsterdam 1619, the van Leeuwin 1622, Carstensz in the Leijden 1623, Nuyts in the Gulden Zeepaert 1627, de Wit in the Vianen 1628 and the two voyages of Abel Tasman on the Heemskerck and Zeehaen 1642-3 and 1644. New Zealand is shown according to Tasman’s discovery in 1642 but Coronelli incorrectly states that it was discovered in 1654. From Coronelli’s thirteen-volume atlas Atlante Veneto . References: Clancy p.89, ill.6.20 (right sheet only), Quirino p.114, Sweet 73, Tooley 351, ill.pl.22.
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Circa: 1601
Price: $3,500
Mapmaker: Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598) Size: 370mm x 485mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: good, centre fold as issued. One of the earliest European maps of Asia and the standard map of the continent for more than forty years. Published in Ortelius’s Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, widely regarded as the first modern atlas, having all the maps in a similar size and format. Ortelius was the first to separate ancient and recent geographic knowledge in his maps and to indicate the changes from the old nomenclature to the new. Beautifully embellished with an ornate title cartouche, galleons and spherical meridians of longitude and latitude. The map is drawn on a cordiform projection but the continent has been extended too far to the east, based on Ptolemy’s miscalculation of the longitude of Eurasia. The sources of the map are Gastaldi 1560, Mercator 1569 and portolan charts by the Portuguese mapmaker Fernao Vaz Dourado who was based in Goa. This map, along with Ortelius’s map of the East Indies were the first published works to chart the island of Formosa (Taiwan) and to identify it by that name. Only the tip of Terra Australis Incognita is shown, the remainder being beyond the scope of the map. This is the second plate of the map, which Ortelius published in his atlas from 1575 onwards. It is identified by the removal of ‘Cum priuilegio’ in the lower left corner, the replacement of ‘La Farfarna’ in the upper right corner in the sea, with a lower case ‘farfarna’ and the removal of the town ‘Ara’ above ‘Aden’. His decision to make a new plate appears to have been the result of substandard engraving, with a number of the earlier states showing a faint impression, especially in the lower right section of the maps.The engraving of all the copper plates was done by Frans Hogenberg. References: Broecke 7, Clancy p.25, ill.1.12, Moreland pp.98-99, Quirino p.96, Richardson p.201, ill.p.202, 212-213, Suarez (A) pp.164-167, ill. Fig. 85, Sweet 5, Walter 11C.
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Circa: 1905
Price: $300
Artist: A.Chevallier Taylor. Colour lithograph, 375mm x 250mm. Minor spotting on bottom, otherwise in good condition. Bernard James Tindal Bosanquet 1877-1936 Oxford University and Middlesex Batsman and fast-medium bowler.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $300
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $1,850
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1886
Price: $75
Artist: Albert Henry Fullwood (1863-1930) Hand coloured engraving, 110mm x 235mm. In good condition. Albert Henry Fullwood (1863-1930) came to Australia at the age of 18 and became staff artist on the Bulletin and subsequently had a great influence on Australia art. He worked with such greats as Roberts & Arthur Streeton. This engraving is from the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia which was the most ambitious publishing venture in Australian history up to the 1900's. It was conceived and financed by American publishers under the name of the Picturesque Atlas Publishing Co Limited, Sydney and Melbourne. It's ambitious aims of using the best artists, the best paper, the finest printing engraving techniques and for it to be the most comprehensive survey of Australia's colonial history ensured that it inevitably was doomed to be a financial failure. The legacy that it left on the other hand was some of the finest engravings and maps printed in Australia in the C19th.
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Circa: 1880
Price: $110
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 150mm x 227mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $250
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1807
Price: $850
Artist: Audebert Copper engraving,hand coloured, 380mm x 245mm. In good condition. Hornbill. Spectacular Malaysian native.
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Circa: 1882
Price: $525
Artist: Rosa Catherine Fiveash (1854-1938). Lithograph printed in colour, 445mm x 340mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1561
Price: $2,000
Mapmaker: Girolamo Ruscelli (c.1500-1566) Size: 180mm x 244mm, Copper engraving. Condition: Good. This is the rare first state of Ruscelli’s world map included in his translation of Ptolemy’s Geographia, printed by Vincenzo Valgrisi. It features a stipple engraved sea and numerous rhumb lines radiating from seventeen focal points. The map is based on Gastaldi’s world map of 1548 which he designed for use in maritime navigation and was engraved by Giulio and Livio Sanuto. The map contains only minimal interior detail but includes several important ports and trading posts including, Zanzibar on the east coast of Africa and Cambay, one of India’s two main ocean ports, visited by Marco Polo in 1293. The Magellan Strait, at the southern tip of South America is labelled and Tierra del Fuego is shown as a very large island. Curiously, the large southern continent of Terra Australis Incognita that appears in other maps of the period is not depicted. The map records the changing nature of cartography in the sixteenth century as mapmakers began to escape the influence of Ptolemy’s Geographia which had been the main source of geographical knowledge for some 1,500 years. Gilolo, the largest island in the Moluccas (Spice Islands) is shown, although incorrectly positioned. After the signing of the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494, Spain and Portugal agreed that all newly discovered lands to the east of the Cape Verde Islands belonged to Portugal and those to the west to Spain. Initially, the ‘line’ did not encircle the world but after Portugal discovered the Moluccas in 1512, which were the only sources of nutmeg and cloves in the world, Spain claimed that the islands fell within their hemisphere. The issue was settled with the Treaty of Zaragoza in 1529 with Spain agreeing to relinquish its claim to the islands for a payment of 350,000 ducats by Portugal. From Ruscelli’s La Geografia de Claudio Tolomeo Venice. References: Burden p.34, Schilder p.123, Shirley 111, pl.95, Stevens p.50, Suarez (A) p.130.
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Circa: 1889
Price: $145
Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 360mm x 260mm. The best coloured set we have had. In good condition.
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Circa: 1773
Price: $3,850
Mapmaker: James Cook (1728-1779), Size: 355mm x 660mm, Copper engraving. Condition: good, folds as issued. A seminal map in the charting of the Australian continent and the most up-to-date chart of the Pacific for its time. The discoveries made by Cook in the Endeavour on his first voyage 1768-1771 are shown for the first time, including the charting of the east coast of Australia and New Zealand. With the charting of the east coast, the geographical limits of the South Land were now known. The map also includes the tracks and discoveries of Wallis, Carteret and Byron. The discovery of Tahiti and the recording of its longitude are important and often overlooked achievements of the Wallis expedition as they paved the way for future cartographic endeavours and further exploration of the Pacific. Wallis announced his discovery three months prior to the departure of the Endeavour from Plymouth. On 30 July 1768, the Lords of the Admiralty signed Cook’s secret instructions for the voyage of the Endeavour. The instructions were in two parts, the second of which was sealed, only to be opened by Cook himself. The first task was to sail to Tahiti from where Cook and his crew were instructed to observe the Transit of Venus. The document included the request that ‘When this service is perform’d you are to put to Sea without Loss of Time, and carry into execution the Additional Instructions contained in the inclosed Sealed Packet’. The sealed instructions contained the Admiralty’s true reasons for supporting the voyage. In addition to observing the Transit of Venus, Cook was commanded to find the South Land, a ‘Land of great extent’ that was thought to exist in the southern latitudes. The orders continued, ‘You are to proceed … southward in order to make discovery of the Continent above-mentioned until you arrive in the latitude of 40º, unless you sooner fall in with it’. Undertaken at the height of the Age of Enlightenment, Cook’s voyage heralded a new era of scientific exploration in which the two dominant maritime and scientific powers, France and Britain, would confront each other in a great rivalry for power and discovery. References: Clancy p.96, ill.6.32, Clancy p.121, ill.pp.122-3 (German edition), Perry pl.32, pl.33 & pl.34, Prescott 1773.01, Tooley 321.
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Circa: 1855
Price: $425
Mapmaker: J.Jones. Rare detailed map of part of King Island from a report on light houses. Lithograph,hand coloured, 440mm x 360mm, In good condition, folds as issued.
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Circa: 1886
Price: $195
Artist: Albert Cooke (1836-1902). Hand coloured engraving, 200mm x 175mm. In good condition. Lively view of Collins Street with a tram in the foreground.
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Circa: 1878
Price: $75
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 165mm x 115mm. Small printing spots at top otherwise, in good condition. Scarce engraving from the original edition of the Australasian Sketcher.
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Circa: 1877
Price: $245
Artist unknown Australian school. Hand coloured engraving, 177mm x 227mm. In good condition. From the original edition of the Australasian Sketcher, rare.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $400
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist: John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) Lithograph, 260mm x 370mm. John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $250
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock. Hand coloured engraving,520mm x 395mm, Fine condition, centre fold as issued.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $250
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock. From the original edition of Hiscock's, "Atlas of the Settled Counties of Victoria". Rare. Hand coloured lithograph, In good condition, centre fold as issued.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $250
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock. From the original edition of Hiscock's, "Atlas of the Settled Counties of Victoria". Rare. Hand coloured lithograph, 39mm x 520mm. In good condition, centre fold as issued.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $595
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock From the original edition of Hiscocks, "Atlas of the settled counties & districts of Victoria". Rare. Hand coloured lithograph, 400mm x 520mm. Condition: Very toning along lower centre fold otherwise in very good condition.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $275
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1889
Price: $45
Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 260mm x 360mm. The best coloured set we have had. In good condition.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $295
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock From Hiscocks, "Atlas of the settled counties & districts of Victoria". Scarce. Fine condition, centre fold as issued. Hand coloured engraving, 520mm 395mm.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $250
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock From Hiscocks, "Atlas of the settled counties & districts of Victoria". Scarce. Hand coloured engraving, 520mm x 395mm. Good condition, centre fold as issued.
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Circa: 1706
Price: $7,500
Map Maker: Pieter Schenk's (1661-1715) Copper engraving, original colour, 520mm x 595mm. In good condition. Striking world map which is based on Carel Allard's design which first appeared in 1696. The traditional decorative border of many seventeenth century world maps has dispappeared and the twin spheres are surrounded by eight smaller projections depicting the world from various angles and four smaller circular diagrams. The dark cross-hatched background provides a striking contrast. Shirley 578 NLA Bib ID 1825591
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Circa: 1882
Price: $250
Artist: Rosa Catherine Fiveash (1854-1938). Lithograph printed in colour, 445mm x 340mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1856
Price: $195
Map Maker:Alex Keith Johnston. Engraving printed in colour, 235mm x 305mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist:John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections. Lithograph with one tint, 225mm x 355mm.
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Circa: 1827
Price: $750
Artist: W.J.Hooker. Hand coloured engraving, 210mm x 245mm. In good condition, folds as issued.
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Circa: 1882
Price: $475
Artist: Rosa Catherine Fiveash (1854-1938). Lithograph printed in colour, 445mm x 340mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1854
Price: $375
Artist: Thomas Ham (1821-1870). Hand coloured engraving, 117mm x 180mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1875
Price: $300
Artist: John Gould (1804-1881) Hand coloured lithograph, 510mm x 380mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1547
Price: $3,000
Mapmaker: Nicholas Vallard In good condition. Size: 380mm x 560mm. Colour lithograph. This beautiful map of ‘Jave la Grande’, published in 1856, is based on a chart by Nicholas Vallard from his 1547 manuscript atlas produced in Dieppe, France between 1540 and 1570. This map was made to promote the dispersal of Sir Thomas Phillipps’s enormous collection which contained the Vallard atlas. The collection took many years to disperse and the atlas was ultimately acquired in the 1920s by the legendary collector Henry E. Huntington, now in the library named after him. The landmass is decorated with an elaborate scene of an Asiatic village surrounded by trees bearing tropical fruit and vegetation. In the background, several warring tribes and a rocky, mountainous landscape can be seen, while on the side panels are four mythological scenes. The sea is richly decorated with several imaginary sea monsters, a compass rose and a galleon in full sail. The map is orientated with north to the bottom and when rotated 180 degrees, the charting closely resembles the east coast of Australia from Cape York Peninsula, south to Wilson’s Promontory and west to the South Australian gulfs and Kangaroo Island. When published it was labelled the ‘First Map of Australia’, an assertion that at the time, caused great controversy since it challenged James Cook’s previous recognition as being the first European to discover the east coast of Australia. The controversy over the Dieppe maps has polarised cartographic scholars and historians due to speculation that these maps depict parts of the Australian continent decades prior to the first recorded discovery by the Dutch in 1606. The inclusion of various Portuguese place names on the large landmass named ‘Jave la Grande’ have led to theories that the Portuguese were the first to discover Australia. The Portuguese presence in Timor and various points of archaeological and anecdotal evidence have been used to support this underlying case. The assertion that the ‘Jave la Grande’ landmass depicted in this and several other Dieppe maps is Australia, was first proposed by Alexander Dalrymple of the Royal Society in 1786, and was later advanced by several others during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including R.H. Major (1859), George Collingridge (1895), Kenneth McIntyre (1977), Roger Herve (1983), Helen Wallis (1980s) and Lawrence Fitzgerald (1984). More recent scholarship by Fitzgerald and Peter Trickett has theorised that this map could have been based on multiple Portuguese navigational charts which were then misaligned by the mapmakers at Dieppe. If the theory is correct, a large bay named ‘Baie Neue’ could well refer to Cook’s Botany Bay. References: Reinhartz pp.70-71, 74,136, ill.pp.70-71,137, Schilder pp.21-22, Suarez (A) ill. fig.3, p.13.
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Circa: 1889
Price: $450
Calyptorhynchus Funereus. Funeral Cockatoo. Calyptorhynchus Xanthonotus. Yellow-eared Black Cockatoo. Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 260mm x 360mm. The best coloured set we have had. One or two spots otherwise in good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist: John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections. Lithograph with one tint, 225mm x 335mm.
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Circa: 1865
Price: $325
Artist unknown, English school. Hand coloured engraving, 148mm x 520mm. In good condition, centre fold as issued. Charming and detailed panoramic view of Algiers.
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Circa: 1865
Price: $375
Mapmaker: A.H. Petermann (1822-1898). Very rare geological map from Petermann's, Geographische Mittheilungen. Colour lithograph, 245mm x 427mm.
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Circa: 1857
Price: $195
Artist: Samuel Thomas Gill (1818-1880). Hand coloured engraving, 110mm x 170mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1857
Price: $295
Artist: Samuel Thomas Gill (1818-1880). Hand coloured engraving, 150mm x 250mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1884
Price: $225
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 213mm x 307mm. In good condition. Scarce image from the original edition of the Australasian Sketcher.
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Circa: 1912
Price: $475
Artist:Andrew Affleck (1874-1935). Original etching signed in pencil lower right, 300mm x 195mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1840
Price: $145
Artist:Thomas Allom (1804-1872). Hand coloured steel engraving, 127mm x 190mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1729
Price: $750
Map Maker: Covens & Mortier. Hand coloured copper engraving,320mm x 395mm. In good condition, centre folds as issued. Plan of Jerusalem according to Josephus, published in Luytens 'Histoire For.....". For centuries Flavius Josephus', a Jewish historian, works were more widely read in Europe than any book other than the Bible. It is believed Josephus is a primary source of knowledge for much of the history of Judaism in the First Century CE.
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Circa: 1635
Price: $3,500
Mapmaker: Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638) Size: 410mm x 505mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: Paper aged toned, some browning to margins. The first printed map to include the Dutch discoveries made on Cape York Peninsula and Australia’s west coast. An excellent example of The Golden Age of Dutch cartography, superbly embellished with rhumb lines, compass roses, cherubs and galleons. At centre top is a title cartouche held by two male figures dressed in Asian livery and in the lower left corner is a Latinised dedication to Laurens Reael (‘Lavrentio Real’) who had served as Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies 1616-1617. The dedication is signed by Blaeu and is guarded by a female warrior and an armoured knight. Several cherubs are depicted along the lower border, playing with musical and navigational instruments. Hessel Gerritsz, the official cartographer of the VOC, produced the original map between 1628-1632. Blaeu had taken over from Gerritsz as VOC mapmaker in 1633, and in that position had access to the latest navigational information available from the East Indies. Helped by his friend Reael, Blaeu obtained the copper plate for this new map after the death of Gerritsz to add to his two volume Atlas Novus of 1634. Consequently the map has a number of the early Dutch discoveries including those by Dirk Hartog 1616 (‘T Landt van Eendracht’), Lenaert Jacobs in the Mauritius 1618 (‘Willems Revier’), Jan Carstensz on the western side of the Cape York Peninsula 1623 and de Wit on the northwest coast 1628 (‘G.F.de Wits Landt’). Also noted are the Trial Islands near present-day Dampier named after the English ship the Trial. The Trial had sailed for Java and was only the second English ship to use the new sea route to the Indies pioneered by Brouwer in 1611 which took advantage of the westerly trade winds known as the Roaring Forties. The Trial had struck unknown ‘rocks’ on 25 May 1622 at night, in good weather and was wrecked with only forty-six survivors including Captain Brookes. In Brookes’s subsequent report, he stated that the rocks were well west of their true position in attempt to avoid blame for his error. Within weeks of the Trial’s wreck, another Dutch ship ran into difficulty in the area which caused great concern to the VOC. It was resolved in 1622 that two ships, the Haring and Hasewint, should voyage south to chart the South Land but en route the ships had to aid, the Mauritius and ‘t Wapen van Rotterdam, consequently the voyage came to nothing. In 1623, two more ships, the Pera and Arnhem , were sent under the command of Jan Carstensz and Willem van Colster, resulting in the successful charting of the west coast of Cape York. The urgent need for more information of the west coast of Australia prompted Hessel Gerritsz, the official VOC cartographer 1617-1632, to issue a map in 1627 which included the Trial Rocks, to provide mariners with more accurate cartography of the region, Gerritsz’s use of the reports from the English survivors of the Trial led to him to incorrectly place the islands. He stated ‘Here the English ship the Trial went down in June 1622’. Due to their incorrect placement on Gerritsz’s chart, the Trial Rocks remained a mystery for a further two hundred years until Phillip Parker King in the Mermaid investigated their position in 1820 and finally confirmed: ‘there remains no doubt in my mind but that Barrow Island … are the same Tryal Rocks’. References: Allen p.80 ill. p.81, Clancy p.79, ill.map 6.7 pp.78-79, Clancy (R) p.77, ill.80-81, Perry p.31, ill.pl.12, Quirino p.105, ill.p.107, Suarez (A) pp.201-202, ill.fig.115, Schilder 40, ill.p.323, Schilder (K) p.81-82, ill.4.18(c) p.81, Tooley 223.
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Circa: 1635
Price: $3,500
Mapmaker: Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638). Size: 410mm x 510mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: Paper aged toned, some browning to margins. The first printed map to include the Dutch discoveries made on Cape York Peninsula and Australia’s west coast. An excellent example of The Golden Age of Dutch cartography, superbly embellished with rhumb lines, compass roses, cherubs and galleons. At centre top is a title cartouche held by two male figures dressed in Asian livery and in the lower left corner is a Latinised dedication to Laurens Reael (‘Lavrentio Real’) who had served as Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies 1616-1617. The dedication is signed by Blaeu and is guarded by a female warrior and an armoured knight. Several cherubs are depicted along the lower border, playing with musical and navigational instruments. Hessel Gerritsz, the official cartographer of the VOC, produced the original map between 1628-1632. Blaeu had taken over from Gerritsz as VOC mapmaker in 1633, and in that position had access to the latest navigational information available from the East Indies. Helped by his friend Reael, Blaeu obtained the copper plate for this new map after the death of Gerritsz to add to his two volume Atlas Novus of 1634. Consequently the map has a number of the early Dutch discoveries including those by Dirk Hartog 1616 (‘T Landt van Eendracht’), Lenaert Jacobs in the Mauritius 1618 (‘Willems Revier’), Jan Carstensz on the western side of the Cape York Peninsula 1623 and de Wit on the northwest coast 1628 (‘G.F.de Wits Landt’). Also noted are the Trial Islands near present-day Dampier named after the English ship the Trial. The Trial had sailed for Java and was only the second English ship to use the new sea route to the Indies pioneered by Brouwer in 1611 which took advantage of the westerly trade winds known as the Roaring Forties. The Trial had struck unknown ‘rocks’ on 25 May 1622 at night, in good weather and was wrecked with only forty-six survivors including Captain Brookes. In Brookes’s subsequent report, he stated that the rocks were well west of their true position in attempt to avoid blame for his error. Within weeks of the Trial’s wreck, another Dutch ship ran into difficulty in the area which caused great concern to the VOC. It was resolved in 1622 that two ships, the Haring and Hasewint, should voyage south to chart the South Land but en route the ships had to aid, the Mauritius and ‘t Wapen van Rotterdam, consequently the voyage came to nothing. In 1623, two more ships, the Pera and Arnhem , were sent under the command of Jan Carstensz and Willem van Colster, resulting in the successful charting of the west coast of Cape York. The urgent need for more information of the west coast of Australia prompted Hessel Gerritsz, the official VOC cartographer 1617-1632, to issue a map in 1627 which included the Trial Rocks, to provide mariners with more accurate cartography of the region, Gerritsz’s use of the reports from the English survivors of the Trial led to him to incorrectly place the islands. He stated ‘Here the English ship the Trial went down in June 1622’. Due to their incorrect placement on Gerritsz’s chart, the Trial Rocks remained a mystery for a further two hundred years until Phillip Parker King in the Mermaid investigated their position in 1820 and finally confirmed: ‘there remains no doubt in my mind but that Barrow Island … are the same Tryal Rocks’. References: Allen p.80 ill. p.81, Clancy p.79, ill.map 6.7 pp.78-79, Clancy (R) p.77, ill.80-81, Perry p.31, ill.pl.12, Quirino p.105, ill.p.107, Suarez (A) pp.201-202, ill.fig.115, Schilder 40, ill.p.323, Schilder (K) p.81-82, ill.4.18(c) p.81, Tooley 223.
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Circa: 1570
Price: $5,750
Mapmaker: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) Size: 355mm x 500mm, Copper engraving, original colour. Condition: Good. One of the earliest maps to focus on the East Indies, published in Ortelius’s Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, widely regarded as the first modern atlas for having all the maps in a similar size and format. Ortelius was the first to separate ancient and recent geographic knowledge in his maps and to indicate the changes from the old nomenclature to the new. Superbly embellished with a pair of frolicking mermaids, galleons, sea monsters, a crest and decorative strapwork title cartouche engraved by Frans Hogenberg (1539-1590). Ortelius’s map of the Indies improved upon the previous cartography of the Moluccas (Spice Islands) by Ramusio 1554, Gastaldi 1562, and Forlani 1565 using more recent Portuguese and Spanish sources. This map, along with Ortelius’s map of Asia are the first published works to chart the island of Formosa (Taiwan) and to identify it by that name. The Mollucas were visited by the Italian traveller Varthema who reached the island of Momoch (probably Ternate) in 1505, seven years prior to the Portuguese. In the account of his travels Itinerario de Ludouico de Varthema Bolognese, published in Rome in 1510, he wrote ‘Here the cloves grow, and in many other neighbouring islands.’ Ortelius correctly locates the islands of Ternate, Tidore, Machian and Bachan to the west of Gilolo and in doing so, provided for the first time a large-scale map published in sufficient numbers to make a substantial impact on the current knowledge of the East Indies. The land of Beach, the northern tip of Australia, is shown emerging from the lower margin and above it lies the mythical land of Java Major which, according to Marco Polo, was the largest island in the world. Polo’s Java Minor is seen here correctly named as the island of Sumatra. References: Broecke 166, 1579L(B)84, Clancy p.70 ill.map 5.16, Clancy (R) p.46 ill. p.44-45, Cortazzi p.20, ill.17 pp.80-81, Parry pp.76-80, ill. plate 3.14, Quirino p.96, ill.pp.86-87, Suarez (A), p.164-168 ill.166-167, Tooley 937, Walter ill.11d, detail 11d.
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Circa: 1630
Price: $2,750
Mapmaker: Jan Jansson (1588-1664) Size: 390mm x 505mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: good, centre fold as issued. Dutch map of the East Indies decorated with an ornate title cartouche flanked by two armed native figures, rhumb lines, compass roses, an ornamental scale of distances with two mermaids and a decorative panel at lower left with Jansson’s name. When first issued in 1630, this was the earliest printed map to record a number of the discoveries made by Willem Jansz in the Duyfken, who made landfall on Cape York Peninsula in 1606, becoming the first known European to reach the Australian coast. In 1605, Jan Willemsz Verschoor, in charge of the Dutch trade in Bantam, on the west coast of Java, sponsored a scheme ‘to discover the great land Nova Guinea and other unknown east and south lands’. Verschoor and his Council chose Willem Jansz as captain and Jan Lodewycks van Roosengin as supercargo. The departure of the Duyfken from Bantam was witnessed by the agent for the British East India Company, John Saris. He reported on the 28 November 1605: ‘The eighteenth here departed a small pinasse of the Flemmings, for the discovery of the Iland called Nova ginna (sic)...’ After leaving Banda, Jansz sailed and landed on the southern coast of New Guinea, naming it Duyfkens Eylandt which is noted on the map. The discoveries made by Jansz on the western side of Cape York Peninsula and his landing at Pennefather River, both of which were marked on the manuscript map of the voyage and in Gerritsz’s 1622 map of the Pacific as R. met het Bosch, meaning River with Bush, are not shown on this map as it does not extend far enough to the east. From Jansson’s Appendix Atlantis Majoris Appendix, Sive Pars Altera. References: Clancy p.77, ill. Map 6.5, Heeres p.54-61, ill.p.59 (detail), Parry p.105-106, ill. pl.4.18, Quirindo p.104, ill.p.114, Schilder map 24, p.290, ill.291
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Circa: 1720
Price: $195
Artist:Jan Luyken. Copper engraving, 340mm x 440mm. In good condition. 'Jacob Meets Esau And he passed over before them, and bowed himself to the ground seven times, until he came near to his brother. And Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him: and they wept'.
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Circa: 1883
Price: $395
Engraver Rudolph Jenny 1827-1905 Hand coloured engraving, 126mm x 240mm. Minor repairs left margin.
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Circa: 1833
Price: $1,500
Artist:Louis Auguste De Sainson (1800-c.1848) Hand coloured lithograph,215mm x 330mm. In good condition. Dumont d'Urville after two unsuccessful attempts sailed the Astrolabe on 28th January 1827 through the narrow gap and named the channel "Passe de Francais."
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Circa: 1921
Price: $195
Artist: Alex Rozeneski (1893-1983). Pochoir, 230mm x 170mm. In good condition. From “Gazette du Bon Ton”, published by Lucien Vogel and his artists all of whom were trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Using the pochoir technique originally employed for colouring woodblock prints in the C15th. Pochoir, used layers of colour to build up the design. As many as thirty stages using gouache paints could be employed in one design. Styles were influenced by art movements such as Cubism, Fauvism and the Russian Ballet. Rare.
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Circa: 1920
Price: $195
Artist: Charles Martin (1884-1934). Pochoir, 220mm x 170mm. In good condition. From “Gazette du Bon Ton”, published by Lucien Vogel and his artists all of whom were trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Using the pochoir technique originally employed for colouring woodblock prints in the C15th. Pochoir, used layers of colour to build up the design. As many as thirty stages using gouache paints could be employed in one design. Styles were influenced by art movements such as Cubism, Fauvism and the Russian Ballet. Rare.
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Circa: 1922
Price: $165
Artist:David. Pochoir, 220mm x 150mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1922
Price: $195
Artist: Mario Simon. Pochoir, 225mm x 160mm. In good condition. From “Gazette du Bon Ton”, published by Lucien Vogel and his artists all of whom were trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Using the pochoir technique originally employed for colouring woodblock prints in the C15th. Pochoir, used layers of colour to build up the design. As many as thirty stages using gouache paints could be employed in one design. Styles were influenced by art movements such as Cubism, Fauvism and the Russian Ballet. Rare.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $275
Mapmaker: F.E.Hiscock F.E. Hiscock / Hamel & Ferguson rare and important map from the first county atlas of Victoria published in the colony, “Atlas of the Settled Counties of Victoria”. The maps were compiled from ‘the records in the Registrae-General’s Department, and the mineral information is gathered from the Department of the Secretary for Mines”. Hand coloured engraving,395mm x 515mm. In good condition, centre fold as issued.
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Circa: 1740
Price: $4,950
Mapmaker: Giovambattista Albrizzi (1698-1777), Size: 295mm x 395mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: In good condition, centre fold as issued. Exquisitely decorated double-hemisphere world map based on Guilliaume de L’Isle’s Mappe Monde of 1700 by Giovambattista Albrizzi, publisher, patron, collector and one of the great figures of eighteenth-century Venetian intellectual and cultural life. Although Venice had been the centre of the European map trade during the sixteenth century, its importance was greatly diminished in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as Dutch and German publishers became increasingly dominant. The extravagant artwork surrounding the centre map was designed by the Italian artist Giovanni Battista Piazzetta and comprises allegorical figures of the four continents in each corner surrounded by scenes depicting examples of their animal life and inhabitants. The map is further embellished with a large framed armillary sphere at the top and an elaborate rococo title cartouche beneath. Australia is shown with the discoveries made by Abel Tasman on his first and second voyages 1642-44. The names of the discoveries made on the western coast of Cape York during his second voyage are shown: R.di Yan Speult, (Jardine River), R.di Coen (Archer River), R.di Nassau (Nassau River) and R.di Caron (Flinders River). With the exception of R. de Caron, all had been named earlier by Cartensz in 1623. The Dutch discoveries by the van Leeuwin 1622, Nuyts 1627, and de Wit 1628 are also included. The tracks of Ferdinand Magellan 1519-21, Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira 1567, Schouten and Le Maire 1616, Tasman’s first voyage 1642-3 and Chevalier de Chaumont 1640-1710 are also marked. After discovering and successfully navigating the strait between mainland South America and Tierra del Fuego, Magellan proceeded north along the western side of the Americas before becoming the first to cross the Pacific, arriving at the Philippines in 1521. Schouten and Le Maire rounded Cape Horn in 1616, proving that Tierra del Fuego was neither a continent nor connected to Terra Australis Incognita. In 1642-3, the southern limits of the mythical land were set by Tasman with his discovery of Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) and the west coast of New Zealand. Chaumont, the first French ambassador to Siam led a mission to convert the King of Siam to Catholicism as part of a larger French effort to gain influence in the country for commercial and military advantage.
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Circa: 1590
Price: $14,500
Mapmaker: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) Size: 350mm x 500mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: Good. The first printed map solely devoted to the Pacific from Ortelius’s Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. This is the first and rarest state, of which only 100 examples were printed. While it is dated 1589, it was not included in the Theatrum until the following year. It was based on Mercator’s world map of 1569 and several portolan charts and rutters from the Portuguese Cosmographer to the King of Spain, Bartolomeo Lasso, which the celebrated Dutch cartographer Petrus Plancius had obtained and later used for his own world map. The Americas were based on a map appearing in the 1589 edition of the Theatrum, which was the first map to separately name North and South America. To the east of South America is a magnificent engraving of Magellan’s ship Victoria, in which he became the first to circumnavigate the world and enter the Pacific in 1520. It is accompanied by a quatrain in Latin which states: ‘It was I who first circled the globe, my sails flying. You Magellan, I led to your new-found strait. It was I who circled the world; by right am I called Victoria. Mine are the sails and the wings, the prize and the glory, the struggle and the sea.’ Magellan’s discovery of the strait between South America and Tierra del Fuego showed that the mythical land of Terra Australis Incognita was not connected to the known world and led Magellan and others to speculate that Tierra del Fuego could be a northern tip of the great southern continent. New Guinea is shown separated from Terra Australis by a strait, differing from Ortelius’s world map from the same atlas, in which he shows it joined with a note querying its status. New Guinea is named ‘Nova Guinea, quibusdum Terra de Piccinacoli’ (New Guinea, according to some the land of the Piccinacoli), after a quote from Andrea Corsali’s 1516 report to the Doge of Venice, in which he claimed that New Guinea was joined to the South Land. Although Torres had sailed through the treacherous strait in 1606, he hadn’t realised the significance of his two month navigation or his probable sighting of the Australian mainland which he had thought was a large island. It wasn’t until 1769 when Alexander Dalrymple, while translating Spanish letters originally obtained in the Philippines, recognised that Torres had indeed discovered the strait and named it after him. The Philippines, visited by Magellan in 1521, are shown, as are the Solomon Islands, discovered by Mendanas in 1567 but depicted much larger than their actual size. The map is beautifully decorated with strapwork title and dedication cartouches featuring swags, garlands and depictions of sculpture in relief. 1590L4 Addblank (identical in text and typesetting to 1592L, but without page number; last line, in small font, left aligned: habitantes mutuò accepisse, non video quis testagari posset. References: Broecke 12.1, Burden 74, ill. p.94, Clancy p.65, ill.5.6, Clancy (R) p.47, ill.pp.48-49, Cortazzi p.86, ill.21, Quirino p.18, ill. pp.18-19, Reinhartz p.47, ill.46-47, Suarez, pp.64-66, ill. front cover, ill. fig. 58, Tooley (A) pp.322-323, Walter p.186, ill.11G
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Circa: 1853
Price: $110
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving,105mm x 205mm. In good condition. An early view looking along the Yarra to Flinders & Market Street.
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Circa: 1713
Price: $3,750
Silver-white canterbury bells. Artist: Basil Besler (1561-1629). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 490mm x 410mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1895
Price: $195
Mapmaker: Friedrich Arnold Brockhaus (1772-1823) Detailed old map of the city with inset of the CBD. Colour printed engraving, 235mm x 150mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1886
Price: $125
Artist unknown Australian School. Hand coloured engraving, 180mm x 250mm. In good condition. One of the few remaining exhibition buildings in the world. This rare engraving is from the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia which was the most ambitious publishing venture in Australian history up to the 1900's. It was conceived and financed by American publishers under the name of the Picturesque Atlas Publishing Co Limited, Sydney and Melbourne. It's ambitious aims of using the best artists, the best paper, the finest printing engraving techniques and for it to be the most comprehensive survey of Australia's colonial history ensured that it inevitably was doomed to be a financial failure. The legacy that it left on the other hand was some of the finest engravings and maps printed in Australia in the C19th.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist: John Skinner Prout (1805-1876). John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections. Lithograph with one tint, 226mm x 372mm.
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Circa: 1882
Price: $195
Artist: Julian Rossi Ashton (1851-1942). Hand coloured engraving,330mm x 235mm. In good condition. John Coode (1816-1892) was a Welsh civil engineer first visited Australia in 1878, when he was brought out by the Melbourne Harbor Trust to report on works for improving the port. Large ocean-going ships had been prevented from approaching the city by the narrow and winding Yarra River and the inadequacy of the port facilities. He recommended improvement of the existing channel in preference to the direct canal advocated by many local authorities. The river was to be widened, deepened and made into a smooth curve by means of a canal through Fishermen's Bend. From the original edition of the Australasian Sketcher, rare.
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Circa: 1847
Price: $950
Artist: George French Angas (1822-1886). Hand coloured lithograph 300mm x 235mm. Some faint spots, otherwise in good condition. "In the very heart of the interior of the North Island of New Zealand, is the lake of Roto-aire; and upon a promontory jutting into that lake, stands the Pah of Motupoi. The pricipal chief belonging to this remote and strongly fortified Pah,is Mungakahu.".....
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Circa: 1857
Price: $145
Artist: S.T.Gill (1818-1880) Hand coloured steel engraving, 145mm x 205mm. In good condition. One of the most important colonial painters & chroniclers of life during the gold rush. Represented in all major art gallery collections. He died destitute on the steps of the Melbourne Post Office.
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Circa: 1825
Price: $750
Artist: J. Alphonse Pellion (1796–1868). Stipple engraving, printed in colour & hand coloured, 240mm x 320mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1828
Price: $850
Artist: Marchairs. Copper engraving, 235mm x 320mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1825
Price: $850
Artist: J. Alphonse Pellion (1796–1868). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 235mm x 315mm. In good condition. From the very rare French voyage account, "Voyage autour du monde" under the command of Louis de Freycinet. Who was also on the Baudin voayge. Artist and naval draughtsman, was a midshipman aboard l'Uranie under the command of Louis de Freycinet expedition in 1817. Pellion assisted the official artists J. Arago and A. Taunay during the three-year voyage around the world. On 12 September 1818, l'Uranie reached Shark Bay, WA, where a camp was established. Pellion's Baie des Chiens Marins, Camp de L'Uranie is in the NLA. The expedition struck camp and sailed for Timor a fortnight later. It then sailed into Port Jackson on 18 November 1819 where they were made welcome by Governor Macquarie, who entertained them at both Sydney and Parramatta and permitted both artists and scientists to wander freely. William Lawson guided the surgeon-zoologist Quoy and the botanist Gaudichaud-Beaupré on an expedition over the Blue Mountains to Bathurst along Cox's road. De Freycinet had intended Arago to accompany them, but his place was taken by Pellion 'whose zeal, activity and courage never failed him in dangerous enterprises, and whose talents as a draughtsman rendered him equally proper for this mission'.
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Circa: 1695
Price: $675
Map Maker: Robert Morden (1650-1703) Copper engraving, hand coloured, 360mm x 420mm. Condition: Slight discoloration on fold otherwise in good condition.
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Circa: 1630
Price: $23,500
Mapmaker: Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571–1638). Size: 405mm x 540mm, Copper engraving, original colour. Condition: good, centre fold as issued. This impressive and important world map on Mercator’s projection by Willem Blaeu is one of the finest and most beautiful examples of cartography produced during the Golden Age of Dutch mapmaking. The map was reduced to one sheet by the engraver Josua van de Ende from Blaeu’s twenty-one sheet double-hemisphere world map (1606), of which there is only one surviving copy. Van de Ende’s signature can be seen to the left of the southern polar projection at lower right. The map was very successful and continued to be published in all Blaeu atlases until 1662. This is the fourth state of the map, first issued in 1630. Blaeu is widely considered to be the greatest cartographer of his time and as official mapmaker of the VOC (1633-1638), had access to the latest geographical information and was renowned not only for including the most up-to-date details in his maps but also for the exquisite and elaborate art that adorned his work. This map set the standard for carte-à-figures maps and is beautifully decorated with a border containing twenty-two vignettes. Along the top, representations of the seven classical planets Luna, Sol, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn are depicted. Seven vignettes along the bottom of the map show the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World after the paintings of Maarten van Heemskerck: the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Colossus of Rhodes, the Pyramids, the Mausoleum of Halicarnasus, the Temple of Diana (Artemis), the Statue of Jupiter (Zeus) and the Pharos or Lighthouse of Alexandria. Letters engraved between the vignettes at top and bottom respectively spell ‘Septem Planetae’ (the Seven Planets) and ‘Septem Mirabilia Mundi’ (the Seven Wonders of the World). On the left are four panels with allegorical depictions of the four elements (Fire, Air, Water and Earth) while on the right, figures representing the four seasons are shown. The map itself includes numerous other decorative features, including ships, sea monsters, compass roses and three ornate cartouches, one held by two mermaids which includes a note on the discovery of America in 1492. The northern Australian coast is shown connected to New Guinea and as part of the larger southern landmass of Magallanica – Terra Australis Incognita. A peninsula west of New Guinea, in the position of northern Australia, is labelled Beach, continuing the error originally included in Fine’s 1532 world map which mistakenly corrupted Marco Polo’s false kingdom of Lochac to Boeach or Beach. Further west, the part of Terra Australis beneath Africa is labelled ‘Psittacoprum Regio’, meaning Land of Parrots. It has traditionally been thought that this was a reference to western Australia. A column on the left edge of the map divides the world horizontally into five climactic regions, after the hypothesis of Aristotle: two ‘Zona Frigida’, one covering the Northern Arctic region and another much smaller region in the south; two ‘Zona Temperata’, one covering North America and Eurasia and the other Terra Australis and the southern half of South America, and an equatorial ‘Zona Torrida’. References: Clancy, 6.1 ill. p.74; Fell ill.3, Perry ill. p.32-33, Shirley 255 ill. pl.201 (1st state).
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Circa: 1630
Price: $17,500
Mapmaker: Henricus Hondius (1597-1651) Size: 380mm x 485mm, Copper engraving, original colour. Condition: Paper aged toned. Superb double-hemisphere world map by one of the most famous of mapmakers and an icon of the Golden Age of Dutch mapmaking. This is the earliest map published in an atlas with a date imprint that shows the discoveries of Carstensz on the eastern side of Cape York Peninsula in 1623. Although the discoveries made by Jansz in the Duyfken had been made in 1606, only those of New Guinea were recorded on Jansson’s map Indiae Orientalis Nova Descriptio of the same year. The map is decorated in each corner with portraits of Ptolemy, Hondius, Mercator and Caesar. At top is a highly embellished celestial globe with festoon and below, is a seated figure of Europa receiving gifts from Africa, Asia and America, reflecting the dominance of the European maritime powers. On either side, the four elements, Fire, Air, Earth and Water, are depicted. There are three further decorative panels within the hemispheres; one titled America describes the discovery of the continent by Christopher Columbus in 1499. For the first time, an eager public were presented with the discoveries that had been made by the VOC of the South Land. Although Hondius had published an earlier separately-issued world map between 1622-29, which showed the Dutch discoveries on the west Australian coast and surprisingly removed Terra Australis Incognita, making that extremely rare map one of the first to remove the mythical land from a world map. Although these changes were not included in this world map, Hondius renders Terra Australis Icognita with faintly engraved lines. California is erroneously shown as an island, a myth created from Father Antonio de la Ascension’s account of Sebastian Vizcaino’s 1602 expedition to explore the Californian coast. It wasn’t until 1701 that mapmakers began to show California as a peninsula. From the Latin edition of Mercator - Hondius’s Atlas Sive Cosmographicae Mediationes , here in its first state of four. References: Allen p.71, ill. p.70-71, Clancy p.74, ill.map 6.2, Koeman 1:203 (1), Schilder 39,ill.321, Shirley 336, ill.pl.256 p.360, Whitfield ill.p.75.
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Circa: 1663
Price: $3,750
Mapmaker: Nicolaas Visscher (1618–1679), Size: 355mm x 465mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Condition: good, centre fold as issued. Superb double-hemisphere world map decorated with the four continents shown in allegorical form, with examples of their animal life and inhabitants. Two circular diagrams depicting the Ptolemaic and Copernican theories of the solar system are depicted at top and bottom between the hemispheres. This was the second world map prepared by Nicolaas Visscher for insertion in a Dutch bible published by Pieter en Jacob Keur with a new address below the plate mark and engraved by Daniel Stoopendaal. This map can be distinguished from Visscher’s bible map of 1657 by the shorter title, which is now displayed in a banner rather than in a panel. Australia is shown with the discoveries made by Tasman on his first voyage 1642-3 and second voyage 1644. Earlier Dutch discoveries are noted and these include: Hartog 1616, Houtman 1619, van Leeuwin 1622, Cartensz 1623, Nuyts 1627 and de Wit 1628. The earliest Dutch discovery of the Australian coast by Willem Jansz in 1606 on Cape York Peninsula is not shown. The VOC, in having sent Tasman on two voyages, not only to chart the South Land but importantly to make contact with the natives and to ‘engage in trade’, were disappointed with the lack of trading opportunities present in the barren and inhospitable land. Consequently, the VOC lost interest in further charting of the Australian continent other than the updating of existing charts. The post-Tasman shape of Australia depicted on maps was to remain unchanged until James Cook discovered and charted the east coast in 1770. References: Poortman 130. ill.p.196, Shirley 431, pl 318.
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Circa: 1675
Price: $8,500
Mapmaker: Frederick de Wit (1630-1706). Size: 440mm x 540mm, Copper engraving, original colour. Condition: Paper aged toned with some light spotting. Magnificent Dutch sea chart published in de Wit’s Orbis Maritimus ofte Zee Atlas in 1675, with north orientated to the left and Australia shown with Dutch discoveries up to Tasman’s second voyage 1644 but excluding his first voyage discoveries due to the geographical limits of the map. A number of other mapmakers made near identical charts using the same orientation, including van Loon 1661, Goos 1666, Doncker 1669 and Seller 1670. This map was based on the prototype by van Loon, issued in his Klaer Lichtende Noort-Ster Ofte Zee Atlas . At lower left de Wit places a decorative title cartouche comprising numerous robed figures, birds and trade goods. It’s use as a sea chart is borne by the numerous rhumb lines and compass points. The other Dutch discoveries noted include: Hartog 1616, Houtman 1619, van Leeuwin 1622, Cartensz 1623, Nuyts 1627 and de Wit 1628. The characteristic feature of Dutch charts produced in the second half of the seventeenth century is that they were based solely on the results of actual observation and where that was lacking, no coastlines were shown. References: Clancy p.83, ill.6.13,Clancy (R) p.87, ill.88-89, Parry p.119, ill pl 4.31, Perry p.51, ill.23, Quirino p.112, Tooley 1369, ill. pl.100, p.204, Suarez p.209, Walter ill. pl.40
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Circa: 1871
Price: $250
Mapmaker: A.H.Petermann (1822-1898). Very detailed map of Victoria. Colour lithograph, 245mm x 430mm, some foxing throughout, otherwise good condition.
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Circa: 1845
Price: $4,750
Gould common name; Red Wallaroo. Modern scientific name; Macropus antilopinus Artist: John Gould Hand coloured lithograph,510mm 380mm. (Gould, 1842). Distribution; WA, NT & QLD.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $175
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660). Copper engraving, 135mm x 165mm. In good condition. From 'Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi'.
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Circa: 1666
Price: $7,500
Mapmaker: Pieter Goos (c.1615-1675) Condition: Trimmed at right. Size: 445mm x 540mm, Copper engraving, coloured. Magnificent Dutch sea chart published in Goos’s De Zee Atlasofte Water-Weereld in 1666 with north orientated to the left and Australia shown with the Dutch discoveries up to Tasman’s second voyage of 1644, but excluding his first voyage discoveries due to the geographical limits of the map. Elegantly embellished with a decorative title that includes scroll work, putti, three galleons, rosettes and a scale of distances. A number of mapmakers made near identical charts using the same orientation, the first being van Loon which was issued in his 1661 Klaer Lichtende Noort-Ster Ofte Zee Atlas , followed by Doncker 1669, Seller 1670 and de Wit 1675. Its intended use as a sea chart is borne by the extensive use of rhumb lines and compass points. Other Dutch discoveries in Australia are noted and these include: Hartog 1616, Houtman 1619, van Leeuwin 1622, Cartensz 1623, Nuyts 1627 and de Wit 1628. Goos’s charts were often used by mariners at sea which led to many being either degraded or destroyed due to the less than ideal conditions. The characteristic feature of Dutch charts produced in the second half of the seventeenth century is that they were based solely on the results of actual observation and where that was lacking, no coastlines were shown. References: Clancy 83, ill.6.14,Koeman Goos Vol IV B(26), McMahon p.8, ill.pp.8-9, Moreland p.114, Parry p.123-121, Suarez p.209, Tooley 670, ill. pl.50, p.203 item.30.
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Circa: 1870
Price: $195
Artist: Francis Wilson Niven (1831-1905) Hand coloured lithograph, 155mm x 255mm. In good condition, centre fold as issued. Scarce plan showing the positions of the stockade.
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Circa: 1870
Price: $195
Mapmaker: Francis Wilson Niven (1831-1905). Scarce plan showing the positions of the stockade. Lithograph, hand coloured,155mm x 255mm. Centre fold as issued, othewise good condition.
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Circa: 1881
Price: $175
Artist: George Rossi Ashton (1857-1893). Hand coloured engraving, 335mm x 235mm. In good condition. This rare engraving is from the original edition of the The Australasian Sketcher, an illustrated newspaper which was published in Melbourne from 1873 to 1889. It was issued on a monthly basis and included a number of high quality engravings to illustrate the news and article. The reason it was issued on a monthly basis was due to the time consuming process of engraving the illustrations which would take one engraver between one and two weeks to make each engraving. This is also coincided with the monthly shipping of mail to England. The engravings provided a unique glimpse into colonial life, often depicting situations or scenes that were less than flattering, in contrast to the majority of sanctioned views that provided a sanitised portrayal of life in Australia. Increasingly expensive to produce, the few illustrated newspapers that made use of original engravings for their illustrations, and that survived the economic collapse of the late 1880's found themselves competing against the new technology of photographic produced half-tone and lino type processes the illustrations. By the turn of the century most had disappeared. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Due to their ephemeral nature few have survived.
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Circa: 1889
Price: $145
Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 360mm x 260mm. The best coloured set we have had. In good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: $1,950
Artist:George French Angas(1822-1886). Hand coloured lithograph,280mm x 410mm. In good condition. A rare and desirable image from the best and largest suites of colonial South Australian lithographs ever done. One of the earliest depictions of "Port Misery" done at the same time as Angas's rival S.T.Gill's views of Port Adelaide. This was the 'New Port' built by the South Australian Company in 1839-40 further up the river. The large building was the Company's warehouse. To the right was the Government wharf.
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Circa: 1878
Price: $175
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 165mm x 225mm. In good condition. Joseph Reed, of the firm Reed and Barnes, was the architect. Reed’s was a grand design, influenced by Rundbogenstil, a round-arched architectural style combining elements from Byzantine, Romanesque, Lombardic and Italian Renaissance buildings. The dome’s design was influenced by Brunelleschi’s 15th-century cathedral in Florence. For the celebrations around the opening of the first Federal Parliament in 1901, the exterior of the building was lit with festoons of small incandescent lights. Source; http://museumvictoria.com.au/reb/history/the-building/ From the original edition of the Australasian Sketcher.
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Circa: 1920
Price: $195
Artist Unknown. Pochoir, 230mm x 160mm. In good condition. From “Gazette du Bon Ton”, published by Lucien Vogel and his artists all of whom were trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Using the pochoir technique originally employed for colouring woodblock prints in the C15th. Pochoir, used layers of colour to build up the design. As many as thirty stages using gouache paints could be employed in one design. Styles were influenced by art movements such as Cubism, Fauvism and the Russian Ballet. Rare.
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Circa: 1885
Price: $195
Mapmaker: Gordon & Gotch. Detailed railway map of Victoria showing railway lines and stations. It also notes coach routes. From the, "Australian Hand Book". Hand coloured lithograph, 280mm x 420mm. Folds as issued, otherwise in good condition.
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Circa: 1571
Price: $18,500
Mapmaker: Benedictus Arias Montanus (1527-1598). Size: 315mm x 530mm, Copper engraving. Condition: Excellent, and with wide margins. This famous and rare double-hemisphere world map by Arias Montanus is the earliest map to show the northern Australian coast in a shape and location approximating its actual position and is radically different from earlier maps depicting Terra Australis Incognita which had traditionally been shown covering the entire southern polar region from east to west. Published in 1571, this map gives credence to the idea that Portuguese explorers had knowledge of Australia prior to the Dutch who arrived on the western side of Cape York Peninsula in 1606 (Jansz Duyfken). There are a number of editions and states of this map, this being identified as the first edition and first state by the engraved seas and the inclusion of the name ‘Iektan’, one of the descendants of Noah, in the fifth line of the table in the lower-left panel. Later editions included the spelling ‘Ioktan’ rather than ‘Iektan’. This first state is particularly rare since the majority of the edition was lost at sea en route to Spain. A beautifully engraved map, featuring four cherubim headwinds along the edges of each hemisphere, galleons, sea monsters and an elaborately engraved sea. This map depicts the biblical story of the re-populating of the earth after the Great Flood and includes text in Latin and Hebrew showing the ‘Table of Nations’ which lists the descendants of Noah, starting with his three sons, Japheth, Ham and Shem, and the countries that they founded. From Christopher Plantin’s eight volume polyglot Bible Biblia Sacra, Hebraice, Chaldaice, Graece, & Latine, published Antwerp in 1571. References: Clancy p.67, ill.5.7, Clancy (R ) p.51 ill. pp.54-55, Moreland p.227, ill., p.228, Poortman 14 ill.30, Shirley 125, pl.107, Schilder 20, ill.p.283.
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Circa: 1881
Price: $245
Artist:George Rossi Ashton (1857-1893). Hand coloured engraving,320mm x 236mm. In good condition. Scarce engraving providing an insight to colonial medicine. One of the few also to show the interior of an operating theatre. Inset titles from top left; The Front Entrance, The Operating Room, One of the Wards, Convalescents in the Grounds. This rare engraving is from the original edition of the The Australasian Sketcher, an illustrated newspaper which was published in Melbourne from 1873 to 1889. It was issued on a monthly basis and included a number of high quality engravings to illustrate the news and article. The reason it was issued on a monthly basis was due to the time consuming process of engraving the illustrations which would take one engraver between one and two weeks to make each engraving. This is also coincided with the monthly shipping of mail to England. The engravings provided a unique glimpse into colonial life, often depicting situations or scenes that were less than flattering, in contrast to the majority of sanctioned views that provided a sanitised portrayal of life in Australia. Increasingly expensive to produce, the few illustrated newspapers that made use of original engravings for their illustrations, and that survived the economic collapse of the late1880's found themselves competing against the new technology of photographic produced half-tone and lino type processes the illustrations. By the turn of the century most had disappeared. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Due to their ephemeral nature few have survived.
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Circa: 1868
Price: $85
Artist: Albert Cooke (1836-1902). Hand coloured engraving,150mm x 115mm. In good condition. From the original edition of the Illustrated Australian News.
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Circa: 1889
Price: $110
Artist: Gracius Broinowksi (1837-1913). Lithograph printed in colour, 360mm x 260mm. The best coloured set we have had. In good condition.
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Circa: 1540
Price: $1,350
Mapmaker: Sebastian Munster (1489-1552) Size: 245mm x 345mm,Woodcut, original colour. Condition:Good. Early decorative map of Sri Lanka mistakenly titled Sumatra, published by Sebastian Munster in his Geographia. In the top left is a superb woodcut of the ‘Pascua Elephantum’ (an elephant at pasture) which Ptolemy wrote in his Geographia, of seeing at the base of the Malli Mountains. In the lower left is a decorative cartouche which includes a note indicating that the island was a rich source of ivory. In ancient times, Sri Lanka was known by various names, Ptolemy named it Taprobana, the Arabs Serendib, the Portuguese called it Ceilão and the British Ceylon. Situated at the centre of numerous trade routes through the Indian Ocean, Sri Lanka was always an important trading link between east and west. As a major exporter of cinnamon, Arab and Chinese traders had frequented the island since early times and it served as an important stop for merchants on the maritime route between Asia and Europe. Much confusion existed among medieval mapmakers as to the identities of the islands of Taprobana and Sumatra which arose primarily from the descriptions in the ancient texts which stated that Taprobana was the largest island in the world. This was later contradicted by Marco Polo in his Il Milione in which he stated that it was Java Minor (Sumatra) that was in fact the largest island. As Sumatra was virtually unknown to most medieval mapmakers their primary concern was the placement of Taprobana on maps. Invariably it was incorrectly positioned off the southeast coast of Arabia but once the accounts of Marco Polo were revealed at the end of the thirteenth century, the eastern limits of the Indian Ocean were greatly expanded and the question as to the identity of the islands became more critical for mapmakers. The Portuguese arrived on the island in 1505 and by 1518 had built a fort in Colombo, enabling them to control strategic coastal areas they had previously captured. Once Portuguese information and charts were copied, the position of Ceylon and the confusion with Sumatra was corrected. From Munster’s Geographia (Latin text on verso). References: Moreland p.82, 302, Parry p.65-67, Shirley p.76, Suarez (A) p.101. In good condition. 245mm x 335mm. Woodcut, original colour. Early decorative map of Sri Lanka mistakenly titled Sumatra, published by Sebastian Munster in his Geographia. In the top left is a superb woodcut of the ‘Pascua Elephantum’ (an elephant at pasture) which Ptolemy wrote in his Geographia, of seeing at the base of the Malli Mountains. In the lower left is a decorative cartouche which includes a note indicating that the island was a rich source of ivory. In ancient times, Sri Lanka was known by various names, Ptolemy named it Taprobana, the Arabs Serendib, the Portuguese called it Ceilão and the British Ceylon. Situated at the centre of numerous trade routes through the Indian Ocean, Sri Lanka was always an important trading link between east and west. As a major exporter of cinnamon, Arab and Chinese traders had frequented the island since early times and it served as an important stop for merchants on the maritime route between Asia and Europe. Much confusion existed among medieval mapmakers as to the identities of the islands of Taprobana and Sumatra which arose primarily from the descriptions in the ancient texts which stated that Taprobana was the largest island in the world. This was later contradicted by Marco Polo in his Il Milione in which he stated that it was Java Minor (Sumatra) that was in fact the largest island. As Sumatra was virtually unknown to most medieval mapmakers their primary concern was the placement of Taprobana on maps. Invariably it was incorrectly positioned off the southeast coast of Arabia but once the accounts of Marco Polo were revealed at the end of the thirteenth century, the eastern limits of the Indian Ocean were greatly expanded and the question as to the identity of the islands became more critical for mapmakers. The Portuguese arrived on the island in 1505 and by 1518 had built a fort in Colombo, enabling them to control strategic coastal areas they had previously captured. Once Portuguese information and charts were copied, the position of Ceylon and the confusion with Sumatra was corrected. From Munster’s Geographia (Latin text on verso). References: Moreland p.82, 302, Parry p.65-67, Shirley p.76, Suarez (A) p.101.
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Circa: 1895
Price: $650
Artist:Jules Cheret French (1836-1932). Colour lithograph. Bonus plate and an important plate as it is the design for the embossed seal on the lower right corner of each Les Maitre de L'Affiches poster. On 16 occassions the monthly subscription of Les Maitre de L'Affiches contained an umnumbered bonus plate and all of which were original designs.
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Circa: 1878
Price: $195
Artist unknown, Australian Colonial School. Hand coloured engraving,255mm x 230mm. In good condition. This rare engraving is from the original edition of The Australasian Sketcher, an illustrated newspaper which was published in Melbourne from 1873 to 1889. It was issued on a monthly basis and included a number of high quality engravings to illustrate the news and article. The reason it was issued on a monthly basis was due to the time consuming process of engraving the illustrations which would take one engraver between one and two weeks to make each engraving. This is also coincided with the monthly shipping of mail to England. The engravings provided a unique glimpse into colonial life, often depicting situations or scenes that were less than flattering, in contrast to the majority of sanctioned views that provided a sanitized portrayal of life in Australia. Increasingly expensive to produce, the few illustrated newspapers that made use of original engravings for their illustrations, and that survived the economic collapse of the late 1880's found themselves competing against the new technology of photographically produced half-tone and lino type processes. By the turn of the century most had disappeared. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Due to their ephemeral nature few have survived.
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Circa: 1852
Price: POA
Artist: O.W. Brierly (1817-1894). Original colour lithograph, 335mm 495mm. Minor creasing in sky otherwise very good condition. The title includes the following information and dedication."Government House and Fort Macquarie. To Oswald Blaxome Esq. Rangers, North Shore & Sydney this print is respectfully dedicated by O.W. Brierly". London Pub June 1st 1852, Ackermann & Co Srand. Rare separately issued print.
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Circa: 1669
Price: $650
Artist:Johannes Nieuhof (1618-72). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 130mm x 160mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1886
Price: $65
Artist: William Thomas Smedley (1858-1920), Hand coloured engraving, 108mm x 177mm. In good condition. One of the few images that depict the Melbourne Law Courts.
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Circa: 1878
Price: $195
Artist unknown. Hand coloured engraving, 115mm x 330mm. In good condition. This rare engraving is from the original edition of The Australasian Sketcher, an illustrated newspaper which was published in Melbourne from 1873 to 1889. It was issued on a monthly basis and included a number of high quality engravings to illustrate the news and article. The reason it was issued on a monthly basis was due to the time consuming process of engraving the illustrations which would take one engraver between one and two weeks to make each engraving. This is also coincided with the monthly shipping of mail to England. The engravings provided a unique glimpse into colonial life, often depicting situations or scenes that were less than flattering, in contrast to the majority of sanctioned views that provided a sanitized portrayal of life in Australia. Increasingly expensive to produce, the few illustrated newspapers that made use of original engravings for their illustrations, and that survived the economic collapse of the late 1880's found themselves competing against the new technology of photographically produced half-tone and lino type processes. By the turn of the century most had disappeared. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Many famous Australian colonial artists were employed such as Julian Ashton, Albert Cooke, Oswald Rose Campbell, Alfred James Daplyn, Samuel Calvert and Elizier Levi Montefiore. Due to their ephemeral nature few have survived.
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Circa: 1695
Price: $725
Map Maker: Robert Morden (1650-1703). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 360mm x 420mm. Slight discoloration on fold otherwise in good condition.
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Circa: 1669
Price: $650
Artist:Johannes Nieuhof (1618-1672). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 285mm x 360mm. In good condition, folds as issued. This engraving depicts the taking of the city of Cotchin (Kochi) on the Malabar coast in southwest India by the Dutch in 1663. Kochi, known as the Queen of the Arabian Sea, was the centre of the Indian spice trade for many centuries. The Dutch had sought a presence in Malabar for some time, both to gain access to the lucrative pepper trade and to secure Dutch Ceylon from the Portuguese. After two unsuccessful attempts to take the main Portuguese fort of Goa in 1604 and 1639, the Dutch decided to target secondary trading posts and found success first in Quilon in 1661 and then Kochi in 1663.
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Circa: 1805
Price: $450
Artist: William Hogarth (1697-1764) Original copper engraving 255mm x 315mm. In good condition. In Plate I, Hogarth combines a defence of the Prime Minister, the Earl of Bute, with an attack on his predecessor William Pitt, Earl of Chatham. In Plate II, Hogarth offers a alternative vision of the war’s peaceful aftermath, dominated by a statue of the King and by the details of replenishment. Sold as a pair.
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Circa: 1669
Price: $750
Artist: Johannes Nieuhof (1618-1672). Copper engraving, hand coloured, 290mm x 360mm. In good condition, folds as issued.
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Circa: 1828
Price: $90
Artist: After John Webber (1775-1793) Copper engraving, 220mm x 170mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1785
Price: $90
Artist: After John Webber (1775-1793) Copper engraving, 240mm x 180mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1922
Price: $165
Artist: David. Pochoir, 230mm x 170mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist: John Skinner Prout (1805-1876). John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections. Lithograph with one tint, 225mm x 360mm
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Circa: 1823
Price: $750
Artist: Luigi Rossini (1790-1850). Copper engraving, 360mm x 450mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $195
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660). Copper engraving, 135mm x 165mm. Small hole right hand sheet edge well away from image, Two vertical creases, otherwise in good condition. The Capitoline Hill is one of the seven hills of Rome. It was the citadel of the earliest Romans. By the 16th century, Capitolinus had become Capitolino in Italian, with the alternative Campidoglio. From 'Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi'.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $155
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660). Copper engraving, 135mm x 165mm. In good condition. From 'Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi'.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $195
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660) Copper engraving, 135mm x 165mm. In good condition. From, Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi.
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Circa: 1660
Price: $195
Artist: Marco Sadeler (1614-1660). Copper engraving, 135mm x 165mm. In good condition. From, Vestigi delle Antichita di Roma Tivoli Pozzuoli et altri luochi.
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Circa: 1854
Price: $495
The most decorative map of Victoria with an inset view of Melbourne. Mapmaker John Tallis. Hand coloured engraving.
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Circa: 1874
Price: $125
Mapmaker: William Hughes (1817-1876) Interesting map of Victoria showing counties and with railways marked. Hughes, a British cartographer and topographer, born in 1817 and died in 1876. He compiled many maps for a number cartographers including, A & C Black, Blackie & Son, Routledge & Philips. Hand coloured engraving, 185mm x 232mm. In good condition.
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Circa: 1847
Price: POA
Artist: John Skinner Prout (1805-1876). John Skinner Prout (1805-1876) born in England Prout emigrated to Australia in 1840 with his wife and seven children. He soon became involved in the colonial life as a commercial artist, lecturing and publishing his own series of lithographs titled, Sydney Illustrated and Tasmania Illustrated in 1844-1846. His time in Tasmania teaching drawing, sketching and watercolours created interest and fostered a number of colonial amateurs. He is represented in all major institutional collections. Lithograph with one tint, 220mm x 350mm